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Russian - English Dictionary of Proverbs and Sayings 3




, , Go on with your idle talk! Said mockingly or ironically to a person who talks nonsense and/or ehose information is not trustworthy = The floor is yours! What rot! Yakity, yakity, yakity! The ass that brays most, eats least :: Go on, Yeremiah - you'll bend my ear!

- Husband and wife have the same interests and views = Such a cup, such a cruse (Contrast: = Every couple is not a pair) ^ They are finger and thumb. They are made of the same leaven # Husband and wife live the same life; they are indeed of the same breed.

, ~ God helps those who help themselves. Put your trust in God, but keep your powder dry. We must not lie down and cry? God help us # Trust in God but rely on yourself.

, Wait till your difficulties are over before you boast of success; do not say it is done when it is not over yet ~ Don't halloo (or whistle, shout) till (or until) you are out of the wood. Never fry a fish till it is caught. Gut not fish till you get them. Never cackle till your egg is laid. First catch your hare, then cook him. Catch the bear before you sell his skin. Do not boast until you see the enemy dead. Don't count your chickens before they are hatched. In the evening one may praise the day.

All cats are grey in the night (or in the dark) = When candles are out all cats are grey

Used (as a comment) about a person who seems to get exactly what he (she) deserves and is worthy of = A little bird is content with a little nest ^ He is not too big for his boots # Such a small (or big) cap just fits the small (or big) chap!

, The dream was close to becoming true [Originally: these are concluding words in many Russian fairytales] ~ There's many a slip 'twixt cup and lip. Between the cup and the lip a morsel may slip ^ The honey was probably sweet, but there was a slip 'twixt the cup and my lip.

¨ - Used when a person does not want to speak about what is not clear yet and will become clear (known) only later ~ Time will show (or tell). We shall see what we shall see ^ We can only wait and see. We'll have to wait and see. We'll see!

, (, ) If one trouble comes, wait for the other ~ Misfortunes never come alone (or singly). An evil chance seldom comes alone. One misfortune comes (up) on the back (or neck) of another. It never rains but it pours. If it rains at eleven, 'twill last till seven. Agues come on horseback but go away on foot. One woe doth tread upon another's heels. Mischiefs come by the pound and go away by the ounce (Contrast: ~ Better luck next time. Wherever a man dwell, he shall be sure to have a thorn- bush near his door)

() At the end of the 19th century and earlier, those were popular farewell words that meant: "Good luck! All the roads are open to you!" Nowadays, however, the saying conveys negative connotations and is used (often: sarcastically) to mean: "I am glad you go away. Nobody is keeping you. Get out!" ~ Good riddance (to you)! Good riddance to bad rubbish! If we never see you again it'll be too soon! Farewell and be hanged! Farewell frost, fair weather next.

: = Let me see, as the blind man said ~ We shall see what we shall see. A blind man would be glad to see.

~ A cracked bell can never sound well. An old ass is never good. An old ape has an old eye. When bees are old, they yield no honey (Contrast: ~ The older the fiddle, the sweeter the tune) # Old age, boy, is no joy.

(, ) () Hard life and old age have made one's health poor, one's attitude indifferent to everything ~ The feet are slow when the head wears snow. A cracked bell can never sound well. The bloom is off the peach (or plum) (Contrast: ~ An old ox makes a straight furrow. The older the fiddle, the sweeter the tune) ^ His dancing days are gone. He is but the shadow of his (former) self # Hills and vales have done in the horse.

Do not be too sure that this will happen; time will show. Used as a warning against being too optimistic when someone wrongly or groundlessly attempts to for tell (good or bad) results before they are obtained ~ Don't count your chickens before they are hatched. Never fry a fish till it's caught. Gut no fish till you get them. Catch the bear before you sell his skin. First catch your hare (then cook him). There is many a slip between the cup and the lip. Praise a fair day at night. Never spend your money before you have it. Don't halloo till you are out of the wood ^ You run (or go) before your horse to market!

Used (as an exclamation showing one's surprise and disappointment) to mean: so, more troubles! ~ Anything to make it tougher! ^ It's going from bad to worse # Things get worse from hour to hour!

, As it goes on, things get more complicated, worse ~ The father in, the deeper. As the days grow longer, the storms are stronger:: Complications begin to set in # The farther into the forest, the thicker the trees. The deeper into the wood you go, the more timber seems to grow.

٨ Nobody knows whether it will happen or not, whether the dream will come true; it is improbable ~ A chance in a thousand. That remains to be seen. There's many a slip 'twixt cup and lip ^ It is still (up) in the air.

Continuation follows


The Conventional Designations and Signs:
1. Brackets in combination with different letter types in the Russian title units. For instance, (, ) (٨) (), where the words are the saying in its basic form. The words (, ) given in brackets, are the variants of the basic component ; the word () is the variant of the basic component ; the word (٨) is an optional component of the saying.
2. Description (in English) of a proverb's/saying's meaning is given in italics, e.g.: (, ) (٨) () Nobody knows whether it is so or not, whether it will happen or not.
3. = is put before an English monoequivalent e.g.: = Appetite (or The appetite) comes with (or in, while) eating.
4. ~ is put before an English analogue, e.g.: () , ~ There's many a slip 'twixt cup and lip; or before an English antonym, e.g.: , (Contrast: ~ No sooner said than done).
5. ^ is put before a descriptive translation, in which components of an English proverb/saying or an English set-phrase is used, e.g.: ( ) - () ^ Beating the air is just beating the air. (The translation is made by way of using the English set-phrase "to beat the air".)
6. :: is put before such a descriptive translation as does not convey the image of the Russian proverb/saying, e.g.: , :: Complications begin to set in.
7. # is put before such a descriptive translation as conveys, partially or in full, the image of the Russian proverb/saying, e.g.: , # The farther into the forest, the thicker the trees. The deeper into the wood you go, the more timber seems to grow.
8. * (the asterisk) is put before those illustrations of the Russian proverb/saying's use where it has undergone an occasional change and/or participates in a stylistic device, e.g.: * -, , , (.. )
Firstly, because mud has a way of sticking, as you probably know
9. . is a sign of reference informing the reader that the site also contain number of similar Russian proverb/sayings, e.g.: . .


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